Storm Katie causes flooding in Shropshire

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This morning 28th March 2016 Anthony Sargeant took this photograph from the bedroom window of his Shropshire (UK) home. It is still windy but no longer raining – the flooding is the consequence of Storm Katie which resulted in torrential rain during the night. As the water made its way down from the Clee Hills of Shropshire in the early morning so the River Corve began to swell and burst its banks flooding the meadows below the house. It is fortunate that the house stands on a rocky outcrop and is not affected by these periodic floods across the water meadows. Below is how the fields normally look in Winter.

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Anthony Sargeant cooks a classic British Dish – Steak and Kidney Pudding

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Steamed suet pudding of beef and kidney with porcini mushrooms served with potato and celeriac mash and fresh green cabbage. Tony Sargeant bought very nice beef skirt from Ludlow Food Centre, Shropshire for this pudding. The suet pudding should after steaming have a crisp outer layer holding the wonderful unctious juices surrounding the beef and kidney.

Winter wonderland in Shropshire photographed by Anthony Sargeant

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This photograph was taken from his Shropshire home last winter (January 2015) by Tony Sargeant. This year there has been hardly any snow in the Corvedale, one or two light scatterings, and very few serious frosts. Is this simple periodic fluctuations in the weather pattern or is a sign of global warming?

Early morning – sunrise in Shropshire photographed by Anthony J Sargeant

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In the early morning long shadows are cast across the Shropshire (UK) water meadows photographed from the bedroom window of his home by Anthony Sargeant. Clear skies over night give a crisp frosty winter’s morning.

Hake fillets cooked by smoking with apple chips by Anthony J Sargeant

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This is a follow-up to the previous posts. Anthony Sargeant cooks and smokes these Hake fillets on a not very hot barbecue which then has apple wood chips sprinkled on it for the smoking. This half eaten fillet is to show the sort of end result of the cooking as judged by ‘the finger test’ – Push gently on the fillet and take it off the barbecue at the point when the flakes just start to separate and look like this (remember it will carry on cooking for a while with the residual heat). Hake is a curious fish in that it is quite soft and somewhat ‘squidgy’ in its raw state when filleting but it firms up on cooking ( avoid over-cooking). On the plate it should retain its firm flaky texture (rather like Cod).

Hake Fillets served with peas and lettuce and a few crushed potatoes – cooked by Anthony Sargeant

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Anthony Sargeant cooked this as described in the previous post. Served very simply with peas and lettuce and a few new potatoes.

Extract from previous post:  [Tony Sargeant uses a small barbecue to cook/smoke Hake fillets. A tray made of cooking foil is buttered and placed on the barbecue the fillets added and apple wood chips added to the charcoal. (Apple wood gives a delicate flavour when used to smoke fish in this way – hickory and other woods are in Tony’s experience too strong in flavour). The fish is then given an initial smoking with the lid on then cider was added to the foil tray as seen here and cooking continued for a further 10 minutes or so with the lid on the barbecue – occasionally ladling cider over the fillets. (the test for cooking is one of finger prodding – the hake firms up as it cooks and it is ready when pressing down with a finger just starts to separate the fillet into flakes. The sauce can then be made with the reserved cider juices plus a little double cream and a squeeze of lemon juice. Absolutely delicious.]

 

Delicious Hake fillets cooked by Anthony J Sargeant

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Tony Sargeant uses this small barbecue to cook/smoke Hake fillets. A tray made of cooking foil is buttered and placed on the barbecue the fillets added and apple wood chips added to the charcoal. (Apple wood gives a delicate flavour when used to smoke fish in this way – hickory and other woods are in Tony’s experience too strong in flavour). The fish is then given an initial smoking with the lid on then cider was added to the foil tray as seen here and cooking continued for a further 10 minutes or so with the lid on the barbecue – occasionally ladling cider over the fillets. (the test for cooking is one of finger prodding – the hake firms up as it cooks and it is ready when pressing down with a finger just starts to separate the fillet into flakes. The sauce can then be made with the reserved cider juices plus a little double cream and a squeeze of lemon juice. Absolutely delicious.