Hake fillet on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage with crushed new potatoes

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Hake fillet on cabbage

Superb thick fillet of Cornish Hake cooked by Anthony Sargeant. The Hake was ordered from the superb fish stall in Shrewsbury’s covered market. Carefully pan fried and served with a chicken based sauce on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage. Hake is in the view of many a superior taste to Cod. Shown below is the size of the Hake from which Tony Sargeant filleted this portion. The remainder of the filleted portions were fast frozen (it freezes very well).

IMG_5334 hake cropped

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Air Pollution in London December 1952

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Anthony J Sargeant remembers the smogs in London during the 1950s when as shown in this photograph visibility could be so poor that paraffin flares had to be used to direct traffic in the city.

The Great Smog of London, or Great Smog of 1952 was a severe air-pollution event that affected the British capital in December 1952. A period of cold weather, combined with an anti-cyclone and windless conditions, collected airborne pollutants – mostly arising from the use of coal – to form a thick layer of smog over the city.

 

In those days most domestic heating was based on open coal fires and in addition there were major coal fired power stations in the centre of the city.

A young girl by Jehan Daly (1918-2001)

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This delightful drawing signed and dated by the artist in 1959 is part of the collection owned by Anthony Sargeant.

Extract from The Independent obituary:-

Jehan Daly – “Jehan”, pronounced John, is medieval French in origin – was born in Llanelly, Carmarthenshire, in 1918. His father, William, was of Irish and his mother of French descent. Daly spoke good French and in his youth was fond of staying with an aunt in France.

William Daly was Principal of Kidderminster School of Art. Jehan studied with him, then from 1937 joined the Royal College of Art, where he met his lifelong friend Ward, already there for a year. Gilbert Spencer, brother of Stanley, was their painting professor, “but he had no influence on Jehan. Spencer recognised that they were both oddities, and they got on because of that.” Daly’s taste ranged from the early Italians through to the then unfashionable Edward Burne-Jones and he and Ward shared a passion for the drawings of Ingres:

After serving in the Army in WW2 Daly cobbled together a living teaching at Wimbledon and St Martin’s, selling the odd picture and illustrating for a magazine called Housewife. He was successful in mixed shows at Wildenstein’s and would be given small solo exhibitions at Agnew’s, where Evelyn Joll was an admirer.

Warm summer sun of the Adriatic

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Anthony Sargeant and his partner drove down through Europe in an Austin A35 van and ended up here in Sibenik on the Adriatic coast of what was then Yugoslavia ruled by Tito. This photograph was taken on a small wooded resort island just of the coast of Sibenik where small ferry boats took holiday makers to enjoy the sun and the sea. Šibenik is a city on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. It’s known as a gateway to the Kornati Islands. The 15th-century stone Cathedral of St. James is decorated with 71 sculpted faces. Nearby, the Šibenik City Museum, in the 14th-century Prince’s Palace, has exhibits ranging from prehistory to the present. The white stone St. Michael’s Fortress has an open-air theater, with views of Šibenik Bay and neighboring islands.

via Wonderful summer of 1966 — Anthony J Sargeant in 1966

Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch

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In 1940-50s South-London there were few washing machines. The mother of Anthony Sargeant did not have one but she did have a cast-iron mangle such as this which was housed in the shed at the bottom of the garden. The shed was in fact a re-purposed corrugated iron from a WW2 Anderson bomb shelter. All laundry was done in a large heated copper boiler in the kitchen using a thick wooden pole to stir it around (the thick pole rather like a metre long broom handle also had another use – it was sometimes used to whack Tony when his Mother deemed him to have misbehaved). Heavily soiled pieces of laundry were additionally rubbed on a washing board at the large ceramic sink in the kitchen. After rinsing out the soapy water in the sink the wet laundry was carried up the garden and put through the the wooden rollers of the mangle to squeeze out as much water as possible. The washing was then pegged out along the clothes line which ran the length of the garden. This was not advisable if the wind was coming from the direction of the local gasworks which was less than half a mile away, because at certain stages of the manufacture of Town Gas the coking ovens door would be opened and the wind would carry sooty smuts across the neighbourhood.

via Mangle used to wring out water from laundry on wash-day – which was usually Monday — Anthony J Sargeant in 1966

G.Mazzolini painted this picture of ‘Cherubs playing in a landscape’ in the 19th Century

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In a lovely carved Italian frame this painting of cherubs amused Anthony Sargeant some 30 years ago when he saw it in a provincial auction. He plans to sell it through Bonhams in Knightsbridge in the next few months. If you are interested keep an eye on Bonhams listings for 19th Century art.