See the last post – Wild Cornish Sea Bream served with Pak-Choi and crushed new potatoes

Standard

wild sea bream with pakchoi and potatoes Boxing Day 2017

Boxing Day Dinner cooked by Anthony J Sargeant – a thick fillet of wild sea bream caught just before Christmas by a Cornish Day Boat. Pan fried in butter and served with the juices of the pan deglazed with fish stock and with a small spoonful of black olive tapenade added. Pak Choi was oiled, seasoned and seared on the griddle. (Tony forgot to take the photograph until after the meal was started).

Advertisements

Boxing Day Dinner – Wild Sea Bream from a Cornish Day Boat

Standard

This wonderful fresh and large sea bream formed the basis of an excellent Boxing Day Dinner cooked by Anthony J Sargeant.

wild cornish sea bream 3

The size can be judged by the filleting knife at the top of the image. It provided 6 good portions once filleted. It made a light and deliciously simple meal on Boxing Day (when many were fighting their way through left-over turkey from Christmas Day Dinner. This glorious fish was bought from Barkworths Fishmongers in Shrewsbury Indoor Market – Shropshire, England – (very highly recommended fishmonger). See the next post for the plated meal.

 

Slices of Cold Mutton (‘left-overs’) cooked by Anthony Sargeant served with crisp English chips

Standard

IMG_5594

Cold mutton and chips – wonderful and very traditional English food. It is important to cook the mutton slowly but when well cooked mutton has a deeper taste than lamb – not quite the simple sweetness of lamb – but it is rarely seen on supermarket shelves or even in many butchers (this mutton was bought from Ludlow Food Centre in Shropshire). Tony Sargeant highly recommends it – it can be eaten hot when first cooked then the remainder can be sliced and served cold as it is here.

Hake fillet on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage with crushed new potatoes

Standard

Hake fillet on cabbage

Superb thick fillet of Cornish Hake cooked by Anthony Sargeant. The Hake was ordered from the superb fish stall in Shrewsbury’s covered market. Carefully pan fried and served with a chicken based sauce on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage. Hake is in the view of many a superior taste to Cod. Shown below is the size of the Hake from which Tony Sargeant filleted this portion. The remainder of the filleted portions were fast frozen (it freezes very well).

IMG_5334 hake cropped

Air Pollution in London December 1952

Standard

fog article-2243732-1658FD75000005DC-295_472x601

Anthony J Sargeant remembers the smogs in London during the 1950s when as shown in this photograph visibility could be so poor that paraffin flares had to be used to direct traffic in the city.

The Great Smog of London, or Great Smog of 1952 was a severe air-pollution event that affected the British capital in December 1952. A period of cold weather, combined with an anti-cyclone and windless conditions, collected airborne pollutants – mostly arising from the use of coal – to form a thick layer of smog over the city.

 

In those days most domestic heating was based on open coal fires and in addition there were major coal fired power stations in the centre of the city.

A young girl by Jehan Daly (1918-2001)

Standard

IMG_5260

This delightful drawing signed and dated by the artist in 1959 is part of the collection owned by Anthony Sargeant.

Extract from The Independent obituary:-

Jehan Daly – “Jehan”, pronounced John, is medieval French in origin – was born in Llanelly, Carmarthenshire, in 1918. His father, William, was of Irish and his mother of French descent. Daly spoke good French and in his youth was fond of staying with an aunt in France.

William Daly was Principal of Kidderminster School of Art. Jehan studied with him, then from 1937 joined the Royal College of Art, where he met his lifelong friend Ward, already there for a year. Gilbert Spencer, brother of Stanley, was their painting professor, “but he had no influence on Jehan. Spencer recognised that they were both oddities, and they got on because of that.” Daly’s taste ranged from the early Italians through to the then unfashionable Edward Burne-Jones and he and Ward shared a passion for the drawings of Ingres:

After serving in the Army in WW2 Daly cobbled together a living teaching at Wimbledon and St Martin’s, selling the odd picture and illustrating for a magazine called Housewife. He was successful in mixed shows at Wildenstein’s and would be given small solo exhibitions at Agnew’s, where Evelyn Joll was an admirer.