Air Pollution in London December 1952

Standard

fog article-2243732-1658FD75000005DC-295_472x601

Anthony J Sargeant remembers the smogs in London during the 1950s when as shown in this photograph visibility could be so poor that paraffin flares had to be used to direct traffic in the city.

The Great Smog of London, or Great Smog of 1952 was a severe air-pollution event that affected the British capital in December 1952. A period of cold weather, combined with an anti-cyclone and windless conditions, collected airborne pollutants – mostly arising from the use of coal – to form a thick layer of smog over the city.

 

In those days most domestic heating was based on open coal fires and in addition there were major coal fired power stations in the centre of the city.

Advertisements

Warm summer sun of the Adriatic

Standard

Anthony Sargeant and his partner drove down through Europe in an Austin A35 van and ended up here in Sibenik on the Adriatic coast of what was then Yugoslavia ruled by Tito. This photograph was taken on a small wooded resort island just of the coast of Sibenik where small ferry boats took holiday makers to enjoy the sun and the sea. Šibenik is a city on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. It’s known as a gateway to the Kornati Islands. The 15th-century stone Cathedral of St. James is decorated with 71 sculpted faces. Nearby, the Šibenik City Museum, in the 14th-century Prince’s Palace, has exhibits ranging from prehistory to the present. The white stone St. Michael’s Fortress has an open-air theater, with views of Šibenik Bay and neighboring islands.

via Wonderful summer of 1966 — Anthony J Sargeant in 1966

Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch

Standard

In 1940-50s South-London there were few washing machines. The mother of Anthony Sargeant did not have one but she did have a cast-iron mangle such as this which was housed in the shed at the bottom of the garden. The shed was in fact a re-purposed corrugated iron from a WW2 Anderson bomb shelter. All laundry was done in a large heated copper boiler in the kitchen using a thick wooden pole to stir it around (the thick pole rather like a metre long broom handle also had another use – it was sometimes used to whack Tony when his Mother deemed him to have misbehaved). Heavily soiled pieces of laundry were additionally rubbed on a washing board at the large ceramic sink in the kitchen. After rinsing out the soapy water in the sink the wet laundry was carried up the garden and put through the the wooden rollers of the mangle to squeeze out as much water as possible. The washing was then pegged out along the clothes line which ran the length of the garden. This was not advisable if the wind was coming from the direction of the local gasworks which was less than half a mile away, because at certain stages of the manufacture of Town Gas the coking ovens door would be opened and the wind would carry sooty smuts across the neighbourhood.

via Mangle used to wring out water from laundry on wash-day – which was usually Monday — Anthony J Sargeant in 1966

Somewhat eerie etching by William Strang RA in the collection of Anthony J Sargeant

Standard

During his lifetime, Dumbarton-born William Strang (1859 – 1921) built up an international reputation as a highly skilled and imaginative printmaker, portraitist and painter. His diverse subjects ranged from the fantastic to the very real, including uncompromising depictions of contemporary life and the effects of poverty and social injustice, landscapes, subjects from the bible, bewildering allegories, and narrative illustrations. He was also a prolific and highly successful portraitist.

via Etching ‘The Visit’ by William Strang RA in the collection of Anthony J Sargeant — TONY Anthony SARGEANT

Detail of Oil Painting owned by Anthony Sargeant of a Child seated on a Shetland Pony

Standard

IMG_5197

A much better professional illustration of this charming picture will be in the catalogue for Bonhams sale in their Knightsbridge Saleroom 21st November 2017. Nevertheless Tony Sargeant points out the somewhat mischievous look in the eye of the Shetland Pony

Anthony Sargeant owns this delightful oil painting of a Child seated on Shetland Pony – to be sold at Bonhams Knightsbridge saleroom 21st November 2017

Standard

 

IMG_5196

Anthony Sargeant comments that the painting by JJ Hill is in excellent condition and there will be a better illustration in the Bonhams catalogue – It is a charming painting – the Shetland Pony has a mischievous glint in its eye

JJ Hill – Victorian Painter – large Oil Painting – Child seated on a Shetland Pony accompanied by a dog in a landscape